Tagged: no kill philosophy

‘A Time 4 Paws’ seeks help for move during last week of July

The animal welfare organization A Time 4 Paws (AT4P) is moving to 594 Cook Rd., in Crossville, Tenn., by August 1.

AT4P’s founder and president Karen McMeekin said, “We are currently looking for volunteers who can help us out during our last week of the move from our old adoption center location to our current, new location.”

During the week of July 27-31, AT4P must have everything transferred out of its current facility at 463 Old Jamestown Hwy. This process involves finishing kennels and cat rooms at the new center and disassembling and moving equipment from the old center before the animals can be transported.

McMeekin said that she still needs people who can:

  • dig holes for and construct fencing
  • fix water lines
  • transport equipment and supplies
  • disassemble
  • paint
  • garden
  • landscape
  • clean

She also said, “We’re still in need of cleaning supplies, bleach. We need sponges that are sort of like rough – the green scrubby pads. … We need some new mop handles, which are for industrial mops where we can change the heads out, … paper towels, toilet paper.

“We need donations of dog food: Diamond Natural chicken and rice dog food. You can buy that at Petsense. You can buy that at Tractor Supply. That’s very important because we have some very large dogs, and we’ve had them for several years. … So we’re going through bags of dog food – 40-pound bags of dog food – very quickly.”

Miranda McNeil started volunteering with AT4P to fulfill eight hours of community service for her Tennessee Promise scholarship. McNeil helps at the adoption center with socializing the dogs and other tasks as needed, and she plans to continue helping the organization long-term.

She said, “Not a lot of people understand the need these places have. I never knew how important volunteers were until I started volunteering.”

McMeekin said, “If [you] are new volunteers who have never been a part of our organization in the past, [you] can email me at savetnpets@gmail.com. … We can set up a time. We’re generally here from eight until three everyday. And the big moving days will most likely be Thursday and Friday and probably Saturday.”

Giving some of your time during the week of July 27 to August 1, will help AT4P meet its moving deadline.

“Our grand opening won’t be until September,” said McMeekin, “but, in the meantime, we need all of this completed for the safety and the health of the animals and for the volunteers.”

Additionally, the group needs help daily at its adoption center and its thrift store at 1201 West Ave. If you are interested in long-term volunteering and interaction with the animals, be sure to fill out a volunteer application.

Be a lifesaver by volunteering with A Time 4 Paws

The non-profit organization A Time 4 Paws (AT4P) has requested the help of volunteers to prepare its new adoption center, which will be located at 594 Cook Rd., in Crossville, Tenn.

Founder and president Karen McMeekin said, “The grand opening will be in late July. We will transfer the animals over to the facility sooner, but, … the end of July is the projected date for the opening for the public to come and experience the new adoption center.”

AT4P’s new center will have 16 heated and air-conditioned indoor/outdoor kennels for dogs. Cats will also live in temperature-controlled rooms with climbing ramps and the ability to move outside into a protected space.

McMeekin said that the AT4P team needs volunteers with a variety of skills to help with the transition to the new location.

To continue work on the Cook Road property, AT4P needs volunteers to donate supplies and gift cards, clean, paint, landscape, do regular lawn care, build fences and pressure wash.

McMeekin said, “We’ll need people who know how to work with chain link fencing, wood fencing, basic carpentry skills – just to donate their time – and we can put them to work.”

Look for the blue barrel at Food City to donate food and supplies to the AT4P AniMeals program. (Photo by Diahan Krahulek)
Look for the blue barrel at Food City to donate food and supplies to the AT4P AniMeals program. (Photo by Diahan Krahulek)

“With the nine and a half acres,” said McMeekin, “there is a pond where we have been excavating and cleaning … to create walking trails. The walking trails will be available for our volunteers to walk the dogs that we have in our programs.

“The walking trails will be designed and created with the help of the trails group from Fairfield Glade, so more volunteers donating their time.”

AT4P also wants to line up people who can transport the animals and who can move equipment from the current adoption center to the new one.

McMeekin added, “We are seeking a full-time kennel manager who has a minimum of three years experience managing a kennel to be our adoption center manager on site.”

AT4P has been promoting the no kill philosophy for 10 years in Cumberland County.

“Our goal,” said McMeekin, “is to turn the entire community and county shelter into a no kill community. … With that philosophy, animals lives are saved. Animals are treated humanely. Laws are followed. Laws are improved.

“A Time 4 Paws wants to educate people – educate them on how to become a no kill community, how to take care of animals, how to be kind to them, have them be a part of their family, spay and neuter them, teach the children responsibility about animals, treating them humanely as God’s creatures – not just as discarded, unwanted animals.”

Donations to AT4P's AniMeals program can be made at Kroger. (Photo by Diahan Krahulek)
Donations to AT4P’s AniMeals program can be made at Kroger. (Photo by Diahan Krahulek)

In addition to help with the new adoption center, AT4P needs volunteers with many day-to-day and special activities.

McMeekin said, “We need volunteers for our events. We transport animals to and from adoption events. We have people we need to socialize the animals.

“We have cleaning … opportunities. We have the thrift store which we need people to process items – and very desperately. We need people who can pressure wash on a daily basis. We need people who can mop floors, clean. We just always need an extra hand.

“We need an events coordinator. I need a marketing person, and I also need a grant writer. And all of these are volunteer positions at this point.”

To learn more information about AT4P and the no kill philosophy, the public is invited to a volunteer orientation meeting that McMeeking hosts at the Art Circle Public Library on the second Saturday of every month. The next meeting will be June 13, at 10 a.m.

To volunteer your time and skills, call 931-456-6906.

Donated items for the thrift store and/or the adoption center can be left at both locations. The A Time 4 Paws Thrift Store is located at 1201 West Ave., and the current adoption center is at 463 Old Jamestown Hwy.

The public can also donate pet food and supplies to AT4P’s AniMeals program at the Crossville locations of Kroger and Food City.

Monetary and gift card donations can be mailed to P.O. Box 2982, Crossville, TN 38557.

Donating + Shopping = Saving Lives with A Time 4 Paws

A Time 4 Paws supports not only an adoption center, but also a thrift store and a pet hotel in Crossville, Tenn.

Volunteers man the AT4P thrift store, located at 1201 West Ave., Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. One hundred percent of its profit helps the organization maintain the animals and operational expenses of the no kill animal adoption center, located at 463 Old Jamestown Hwy.

Karen Arnold has volunteered with AT4P for four years and at the thrift store since it opened in September 2013. She said, “Everyday we have different specials. Then we’ll throw an extra one in. … We want the customers to feel special. We want them to come back, and we want them to … have an idea of what we do [at A Time 4 Paws].”

Pearl Jaco, who also works at the thrift store, said, “People will give money, supplies. They donate everything we get in the store. People are really good about that. Some days we get big donations. … Other days we might only get two or three, but, in general, we have donations everyday of some type.”

At the entrance to the store, customers will find an information table with a photo album of adoptable pets, a wish list for donated supplies and other information about AT4P’s mission. AT4P volunteers also help rescue homeless and abused animals and create educational programs and literature about the no kill philosophy, which all require funding.

Arnold said, “I’m just really inspired by the things going on, and I want other people to see what we do and what we have done and what we’re going for the future with.”

She said that AT4P president Karen McMeekin is looking for 100 acres to create a sanctuary for animals that are never adopted, based on the model created by the Best Friends Animal Society near Kanab, Utah.

In the meantime, the organization uses the thrift store to help with veterinary bills and to fund the various programs it has in place to help people and their pets in the community and homeless and abused animals.

By shopping at the AT4P thrift store, consumers find inexpensive household, décor, clothing and pet supplies, as well as toys, books and holiday items. At the same time, they will be supporting AT4P’s efforts to save, find homes for and create a sanctuary for homeless pets in Cumberland County.

Successful no kill animal programs show change possible for Cumberland County

A Time 4 Pets (www.at4p.org)
www.at4p.org

A Time 4 Paws is a non-profit organization committed to establishing the no-kill animal philosophy in Cumberland County, Tenn.

Karen McMeekin, president of AT4P, said that in 2004, the county and city shelters were killing 85 to 90 percent of the dogs and cats they brought in. In order to reduce these numbers, she often transported large numbers of animals to out-of-state no-kill rescue organizations.

McMeekin discovered the book “Redemption: The Myth of Pet Overpopulation and the No Kill Revolution in America” (2009). Nathan Winograd, the director of the No Kill Advocacy Center, presents a researched-based plan that can change shelters across the U.S. to increase their save rates to 90 percent or better. He has also produced a movie based on “Redemption” that will be shown in theaters this summer.

Winograd’s text gave McMeekin hope for a new plan for Cumberland County, and, at her own expense, she visited successful no-kill programs in Utah, Texas and Florida to learn how to implement the same initiative in Tennessee.

bestfriends.org
bestfriends.org

Best Friends Animal Society (BFAS) in Kanab, Utah, has been a prominent model for no-kill animal programs since 1984. Founders committed themselves to sheltering homeless animals until they were adopted and educating the public about the routine and unnecessary euthanasia protocols in U.S. shelters.

Board member Gregory Castle has served as BFAS’s CEO since 2010. However, as a co-founder of BFAS, he has been advocating for no kill animal programs for 30 years. He believes that communities can eliminate unnecessary euthanasia of homeless animals with organized programs. Through No More Homeless Pets in Utah, another organization he founded, his team developed programs for animal care education, low-cost spaying and neutering and pet adoptions.

http://www.austinpetsalive.org
austinpetsalive.org

Austin Pets Alive! in Austin, Texas, is managed by Executive Director Dr. Ellen Jefferson. She has led Austin to be “the largest No Kill city in the United States.” APA! has a 91 percent save rate, which translates to more than 6,000 animals annually. The center regularly plans broad, creative programs to save at-risk companion animals.

Since 1988, the Animal Refuge Center (ARC) in Ft. Myers, Fla., has provided an alternative to euthanasia of unwanted dogs and cats. They ensure that all animals are treated, rehabilitated and given an opportunity to be adopted. For dogs and cats that are never adopted, ARC is committed to providing them with lifetime sanctuary.

animalrefugecenter.com
animalrefugecenter.com
blountcountyhumanesociety.org
blountcountyhumanesociety.org

Closer to Crossville, the Blount County Humane Society in Maryville, Tenn., has established itself as a no-kill program in Tennessee with a verified save rate of 99 percent in 2014. The group offers a variety of leadership and supporting volunteer opportunities and is very active in promoting its philosophy through social media. Citizens can offer support as on -the-ground members of the Friends of the Animals Advisory Team and financially through the Bark-N-Purr Club.

For board members and other volunteers with AT4P, the goal for a true no-kill animal facility with the Cumberland County government is very realistic. However, they know that they must continue educating the community about the statistics and the proven successes of other programs to counteract the long-standing mindset of pet overpopulation that must be controlled with euthanasia.

A Time 4 Paws brings no-kill philosophy to Cumberland Co., Tenn.

Animal shelters across the U.S. put down millions of animals annually because they have not found homes for these dogs and cats within a small window of time. While shelters have improved their save rate to a national average of 65 percent, no-kill adoption centers are forming in both urban and rural areas to improve this statistic to 99 percent. Staff members and volunteers with A Time 4 Paws, located in Crossville, Tenn., believe that through education they can change this community into one that embraces the no-kill philosophy.

In 2004, Karen McMeekin, founder of A Time 4 Paws, joined the local Humane Society as a board member when the county and city shelter’s were euthanizing 85 to 90 percent of their animals. McMeekin said, “What I started doing was making transports out of the county up north to facilities that would accept them. I transported in my truck and my horse trailer 30 to 40 to 50 animals at a time.”

McMeekin said, “When I was running the Humane Society [in Cumberland County] for three months, we were completely no-kill. We killed nothing. We saved 42 upper-respiratory cats and every animal that had Parvo in there. [Elizabeth Chaste] and I took 12-hour shifts laying on the floor with Parvo dogs, giving them medications that they needed to save every one of them.

McMeekin and Chaste met when they were board members for the Humane Society. They read “Redemption” by Nathan Winograd, the founder of the No-Kill Advocacy Center and strategically planned to implement this way of thinking in Cumberland County.

“[A Time 4 Paws] became a non-profit 501(c)(3) in 2005. We then decided that we should learn other ways – rather than transporting animals north. We felt that we would be killing other animals up north by bringing ours there, so we educated ourselves on the no-kill philosophy.”

McMeekin visited Best Friends Animal Society in Utah and other organizations in Texas, Florida and Washington, D.C. to learn how to develop a no-kill community.

According to the No Kill Advocacy Center in Oakland, Calif., more than 23 million people adopt pets annually, and shelters kill approximately three million dogs and cats every year because they are not re-homed. McMeekin said, “The no-kill philosophy does not say there is an overpopulation. There’s a lack of effort.”

McMeekin said, “I could go on for hours about animals we have helped and people we have helped – not just animals – but the people.”

Fran Long agreed that she has benefited from adopting two dogs through A Time 4 Pets.

Long and her husband Jim adopted Zoe after Jim was diagnosed with cancer. She said that Jim and Zoe were inseparable. A year and a half after Jim passed away, Long decided to adopt another dog. She said, “I wasn’t able to take her to the dog park and walk her as much as we did before – and exercise and play. … I thought, She needs someone to play with to help occupy her time between me getting involved.

“[Zoe] took to Rosie right away, and they’ve been the best playmates. They watch out the front door and alert me to anything that goes on outside.”

Jason Kennedy has volunteered at A Time 4 Paws for four years. He said, “I believe in chances for animals. If I help out, the more chances they get.”

McMeekin continues to look for opportunities to promote the no-kill alternative to Cumberland County, Tenn. She said, “The ultimate goal would be is to not be needed. Wouldn’t that be fabulous? They just didn’t need A Time 4 Paws because everything was a no-kill, everyone took care of their animals, everyone fed them, didn’t tie them out to trees, didn’t use them as target practice, didn’t anti-freeze poison them. It would be fabulous, but until then we’ll keep on fighting.”

The A Time 4 Paws adoption center is located at 463 Old Jamestown Hwy. in Crossville. The thrift store is located at 1201 West Ave, and the pet hotel is located at 2149 E. 1st St.

McMeekin’s next goal is to open a pet sanctuary to provide more room for the animals in which to live and to engage with potential adopters. She said, “We need someone to donate 70-100 acres. Now that would be community cooperation!”

To contact A Time 4 Paws, call 931-456-6906 or email savetnpets@gmail.com. The organization also has a Facebook page.

For more information about the 11 steps for a no-kill community, click here.